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At the request of the Research Councils UK e-Infrastructure group, Janet established a working group from 2013-2016 to support those providing and using e-infrastructure services in achieving an approach that both protects services from threats and is usable by practitioners. More detail about the group can be found in the Terms of Reference The Working Group published the following papers: E-infrastructures: Access and Security (summary paper) (Jan 16) Federated Authentication for e-Infrastructures (Sep 14) Technical Security for e-Infrastructures (Nov 14) Authorisation/Group Management for e-Infrastructures (May 15) Policies for e-Infrastructures (Jan 16) Accounting and e-Infrastructures (Nov 16) Information about the Working Group's activities, as well as discussion documents, links and recommendations is linked under the following categories. Unless marked otherwise, all items are works-in-progress and we very much welcome your comments and contributions. Meetings   Presentations Case Studies Discussions Technologies References     Andrew Cormack (WG Chair)

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Technical Security for E-infrastructures

25 March 2015 at 8:51am

E-infrastructures are large computer systems with considerable processing and storage capacity and in some cases, holding valuable or sensitive data. They are therefore likely to be attractive targets for attackers with a wide range of motivations. However, to support international research, e-infrastructures must be accessible to users located anywhere on the Internet. In many cases users will upload and run their own software or virtual machines and exchange large volumes of data over high-speed networks. Operators of e-infrastructures are therefore challenged both to provide the open and flexible computing platform that is inherent to the e-infrastructure concept and to protect against the consequences of attacks on that platform over the Internet. To help them, the e-infrastructure model offers many different ways to implement security controls. This paper reviews the security measures used by e-infrastructures against a widely-used model – the Cyber-Security Council’s Top 20 Controls – to assess what is being done and where improvements may be possible.