Last updated: 
2 weeks 4 days ago
Blog Manager

One of Jisc’s activities is to monitor and, where possible, influence regulatory developments that affect us and our customer universities, colleges and schools as operators of large computer networks. Since Janet and its customer networks are classified by Ofcom as private networks, postings here are likely to concentrate on the regulation of those networks.

Postings here are, to the best of our knowledge, accurate on the date they are made, but may well become out of date or unreliable at unpredictable times thereafter. Before taking action that may have legal consequences, you should talk to your own lawyers.

NEW: To help navigate the many posts on the General Data Protection Regulation, I've classified them as most relevant to developing a GDPR compliance process, GDPR's effect on specific topics, or how the GDPR is being developed. Or you can just use my free GDPR project plan.

Blog Article

The European Council of Ministers have now published a proposed text for the General Data Protection Regulation. This still needs to be edited by the Commission's "lawyer-linguists" to check for inconsistencies, sort out the numbering of recitals and articles etc. But the working parties of both the Parliament and the Council have recommended that the resulting text should be adopted by the respective full bodies at meetings in the next couple of months.

Blog Article

The Article 29 Working Party of European data protection supervisors had hoped to make a full statement on the EU/US Safe Harbor agreement at the end of January. However this has now been postponed, probably until mid-April. The European Court of Justice declared last October that the original Safe Harbor did not guarantee adequate protection when personal data were transferred from Europe to the USA.

Blog Article

Last week the European Commission published their proposed new Data Protection legislation. This will now be discussed and probably amended by the European Parliament and Council of Ministers before it becomes law, a process that most commentators expect to take at least two years. There's a lot in the proposal so this post will just cover the general themes.

Blog Article

At the moment both cloud computing providers and their business customers in Europe have to deal with at least twenty-eight different interpretations of Data Protection law. And there are nearly as many different national rules and formalities when using non-European cloud providers (the UK approach is described in the Information Commissioner’s Guide to Cloud Computing).

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