Regulatory Developments

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1 hour 53 min ago
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One of Jisc’s activities is to monitor and, where possible, influence regulatory developments that affect us and our customer universities, colleges and schools as operators of large computer networks. Since Janet and its customer networks are classified by Ofcom as private networks, postings here are likely to concentrate on the regulation of those networks.

Postings here are, to the best of our knowledge, accurate on the date they are made, but may well become out of date or unreliable at unpredictable times thereafter. Before taking action that may have legal consequences, you should talk to your own lawyers.

NEW: To help navigate the many posts on the General Data Protection Regulation, I've classified them as most relevant to developing a GDPR compliance process, GDPR's effect on specific topics, or how the GDPR is being developed. Or you can just use my free GDPR project plan.

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Blog Document

Our university and college buildings already contain a surprising number of sensors that could collect information about those who occupy them. At a recent event I spotted at least half a dozen different systems in a normal lecture room, including motion detectors, swipe card readers, wireless access points, the camera and microphone being used to stream the event, and Bluetooth and other transmissions from the many laptops and devices we were all carrying.

Blog Article

Four years ago, Jisc responded to the Board of European Regulators of Electronic Communications (BEREC) consultation on network neutrality to point out that some security measures cannot just be temporary responses by the victims of attacks, but need to be permanently configured in all networks to prevent them being used for distributed denial of service and other attacks. This applies, in particular, to blocking of spoofed addresses, as recommended by BCP-38.

Blog Article

The European Data Protection Board's (EDBP) latest Guidelines further develop the idea that we should not always expect relationships involving personal data to have a single legal basis. Although the subject of the Guidelines is the legal basis "Necessary for Contract", much of the text is dedicated to pointing out the other legal bases that will often be involved in a contractual relationship.

Blog Document

Following on from my previous blog post on the possible uses of wellbeing analytics, we'd very much welcome comments on this latest draft of our Code of Practice. Note that this includes the maximum safeguards from all legal bases that seem likely to apply, so even if our continuing investigations conclude that some of those bases are not appropriate, the Code's recommendations are unlikely to change significantly.

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